SDSU West Updates

Ten Reasons to Support SDSU West

January 30, 2018

1. Open and Transparent Public Planning Process

The SDSU West Initiative requires the stadium site to be comprehensively planned through a public planning process with maximum opportunities for public participation [1]. The Soccer City Initiative was drafted in secret by private developers with no public input [2]. Soccer City also expressly prohibits public participation in the implementation of Soccer City’s development plans [3]

2. Full Compliance with Environmental Laws

The SDSU West Initiative requires full compliance with California environmental quality laws [4] [5] including the preparation of a full Environmental Impact Report (EIR) and measures to mitigate any environmental or facility impacts. The Soccer City Initiative uses a loophole to circumvent any environmental review, avoid preparation of an EIR and evade solutions needed to mitigate environmental impacts. [6] 

3. More Public Parkland Delivered on Time

The SDSU West Initiative site plan contains 90-acres of public parks including a 50-acre River Park. [7] The initiative requires the River Park be provided by San Diego State University at no cost to the City general fund within seven years. [8] The Soccer City Initiative promises 55-acres of parks including a 34-acre River Park, but the initiative removes any deadline for completion of the River Park and limits FS Investor’s financial contribution to half the cost of the River Park. [9]

4. Less Traffic.

The Soccer City Initiative generates about 60% more traffic than the SDSU West Initiative, largely because it would build yet another regional shopping mall in Mission Valley. [10] 

5. Grow San Diego State University

San Diego State University is landlocked and future student growth is greatly restricted. [11]  Thousands of local high school graduates are turned away every year. [12] The SDSU West Initiative will provide the university more land to grow so our children and grandchildren have a chance to attend San Diego State University. [13]  The Soccer City Initiative adds no new university land. [14]

6. Grow the Economy

The SDSU West Initiative will produce more local college graduates to grow our economy, build local businesses, increase jobs and grow wages. The SDSU West Initiative will co-locate the university with research and technology institutions to nurture the innovation economy right here in San Diego. [15] Soccer City’s Initiative neglects the opportunity to use a public asset to grow our economy in favor of a high-density, max return on investment design. [16] [17] 

7. New Stadium for SDSU Aztecs and Professional Soccer

The SDSU West Initiative requires a 35,000-seat stadium that must accommodate football and professional soccer and be adaptable for the NFL. [18]  SDSU must build the stadium within seven years at no cost to the City. [19] The Soccer City Initiative proposes an 18,000-seat soccer stadium, but the stadium does not have to accommodate college or NFL football. [20]

8. Immediately Relieve the City the Burden of Maintaining the Existing Stadium

The SDSU West Initiative requires SDSU to take over maintenance of SDCCU Stadium as soon as the property is purchased, relieving the City from a $7 million per year burden. [21]  The Soccer City Initiative requires the City to continue to pay for maintenance of SDCCU Stadium until FS Investors demolishes it [22], which could be after seven years or even longer (costing the City up to $50 million). [23]

9. Timely Provision of Affordable Housing

The SDSU West Initiative and the Soccer City Initiative both set aside 10 percent of the new homes for low-income households, but the Soccer City Initiative’s affordable housing requirement does not start until ten after the execution of its lease [24].  SDSU West Initiative does not have any delay.

10. Permits the City to Sell Charger Training Site for $29 Million

The Soccer City Initiative converts the 20-acre Murphy Canyon Charger Training Center site from Industrial to Commercial, permits development of hotels on the site “by right”, and exempts such hotels from the airport land use compatibility regulations for Montgomery Field and MCAS Miramar [25]. The SDSU West Initiative does not cover the Charger Training Center enabling the City to sell site for an estimated $29 million, which the City can use to improve public services and retire City debt.

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1. [See SDSU West Initiative Chapter 3 § 22.0908 (f)] “After such sale, the Existing Stadium Site shall be comprehensively planned through an SDSU Campus Master Plan revision process, which process requires full compliance with the California Environmental Quality Act (Pub. Resources Code commencing with section 21000), the State CEQA Guidelines (14 Cal. Code Regs., commencing with section 15000), and Education Code section 67504, subdivisions (c) and (d), along with ample opportunities for public participation, including but not limited to input from the Mission Valley Planning Group.”


2. FOX 5 News, “Mayor Criticized for Private Meetings with Soccer City," [http://fox5sandiego.com/2017/05/29/mayor-criticized-for-private-meetings-with-soccercity-report/]

3. [See Soccer City Initiative Page 231; Specific Plan Section 8.8.4, Page 8.8]  “An application for an approval processed in accordance with Process One shall be approved by the Development Services Department Director or his/her designee if the application meets the requirements of this Specific Plan. A public hearing will not be held.”

4. [See SDSU West Initiative Chapter 3 § 22.0908 (f)] “After such sale, the Existing Stadium Site shall be comprehensively planned through an SDSU Campus Master Plan revision process, which process requires full compliance with the California Environmental Quality Act (Pub. Resources Code commencing with section 21000), the State CEQA Guidelines (14 Cal. Code Regs, commencing with section 15000), and Education Code section 67504, subdivisions (c) and (d), along with ample opportunities for public participation, including but not limited to input from the Mission Valley Planning Group.”
    

5. [See SDSU West Initiative Chapter 3 § 22.0908 (h)]  “The environmental commitment set forth in subdivision (f) shall include the requirements arising under CEQA for SDSU to: (i) take steps to reach agreements with the City of San Diego and other public agencies regarding the payment of fair-share mitigation costs for any identified off-site significant impacts related to campus growth and development associated with the Existing Stadium Site; and (ii) include at least two publicly noticed environmental impact report (EIR) scoping meetings, preparation of an EIR with all feasible alternatives and mitigation measures, allowance for a 60-day public comment period on the Draft EIR, preparation of written responses to public comments to be included in the Final EIR, and a noticed public hearing.”

6. See, e.g., DeVita v. County of Napa (1995) 9 Cal.4th 763, 793–795.  [See Soccer City Initiative Page 285. Development Agreement Section 7.] “Except as otherwise set forth in this Agreement, the City shall not require the Developer and/or Developer’s Assigns to obtain any further discretionary approvals or permits for the development of the Property in accordance with this Agreement during the term of this Agreement unless such permits or approvals are required by the Development Regulations or by the terms of this Agreement.”

7. SDSU NewsCenter, “SDSU Reveals Detailed Plan for Mission Valley Site,” [http://newscenter.sdsu.edu/sdsu_newscenter/news_story.aspx?sid=77033]

8. [See SDSU West Initiative Chapter 3 § 22.0908 (i)]  “River Park improvements shall be made at no cost to the City General Fund and completed not later than seven years from the date of execution of the sales agreement.”

9. [See Soccer City Initiative Page 29, Section 61.2804 (i)]   “… if the Execution Date of the final Lease provided for in this Division is delayed beyond December 31, 2017 for any reason (except for the limited exception in this subsection): (i) the Qualified Lessee’s obligations to improve City land for public recreation purposes under any Lease and the Specific Plan shall be reduced by $20,000,000; and (ii) the Qualified Lessee’s obligations to build parks shall not be subject to any time limits, mandatory start dates, or mandatory completion dates…”

10. UT Article December 1, 2017  Study: Soccer City Stadium Traffic Is Higher Than Backers Say.  “A finalized study released Friday afternoon says 97,000 average daily trips would be generated by the mixed-use development plan with a new sports stadium, housing, offices, retail, hotels and parkland. Soccer City’s projection was 71,500 trips daily. What about San Diego State University’s SDSU Mission Valley plan unveiled this week? The projects are similar but Soccer City would build about twice as much retail and office space. SDSU Mission Valley would create 55,140 daily trips, according to numbers supplied by the university on Friday afternoon.”

11. UT Article January 28, 2018, Change Is Coming to San Diego State.  “But there are a few areas left to build on the 288-acre campus, limiting enrollment growth at a time when SDSU is receiving record numbers of applications.”

12. CBS8 News, December 19, 2018.  SDSU Sets Record For 2018 Admission Applicants.  “San Diego State University set new records for the number of students who applied for admission for next year -- 68,475 prospective freshmen and 25,135 transfers. It's the first time SDSU has topped 90,000 total applications, and marks an 11 percent increase over last year. Applications to SDSU have been increasing over the past decade, school officials said.”

13. SDSU NewsCenter, “SDSU Reveals Detailed Plan for Mission Valley Site,” [http://newscenter.sdsu.edu/sdsu_newscenter/news_story.aspx?sid=77033]

14. See Soccer City Initiative Page 124, Specific Plan Figure 3.1 Conceptual Overall Land Plan Page 3.2.

15. SDSU NewsCenter, “SDSU Reveals Detailed Plan for Mission Valley Site,” [http://newscenter.sdsu.edu/sdsu_newscenter/news_story.aspx?sid=77033]

16. See Soccer City Initiative Page 124, Specific Plan Figure 3.1 Conceptual Overall Land Plan Page 3.2.

17. [See Soccer City Initiative Page 123, Specific Plan Section 3.1.1, Page 3.1.] “Additional development around the stadium may include approximately 4,800 multi-family residential units, of which 800 units are student focused housing, 450 hotel rooms, 740,000 square feet of retail space, and 2.4 million square feet of office use, subject to the traffic caps discussed below.”

18. [See SDSU West Initiative Chapter 3 § 22.0908 (c) (1)] “Such sale shall provide for the development of: (1) A new Joint Use Stadium for SDSU Division 1 collegiate football and other Potential Sports Partners including but not limited to professional, premier, or MLS soccer and adaptable for the NFL”  [See SDSU West Initiative Chapter 3 § 22.0908 (x) (9)] “ ‘Joint Use Stadium’ means a quality multi-use outdoor stadium comprised of approximately 35,000 seats for collegiate and professional sports, including use for SDSU Division 1 football, National Collegiate Athletic Association Football Bowl Subdivision Division 1 programs, the National Football League, professional, premier, or Major League Soccer, collegiate and professional football bowl games, other sports, and other events, including without limitation concession areas, restaurants, bars, clubs, retail stores, kiosks, media facilities, athletic training and medical facilities, locker rooms, offices, meeting rooms, banquet facilities, ticketing facilities, on- and off-site signage, scoreboards, and other ancillary and support uses and facilities customarily made part of a stadium of the quality necessary to house collegiate and professional or premier sports, civic events, conventions, exhibitions, concerts and other outdoor events.”

19. [See SDSU West Initiative Chapter 3 § 22.0908 (j)]  “Such sale shall result in the demolition, dismantling, and removal of the Existing Stadium and construction of a new Joint Use Stadium. The construction of the Joint Use Stadium shall be completed not later than seven years from the date of execution of the sales agreement.”

20.  [See Soccer City Initiative Page 105, Specific Plan Section 1.3, page 1.3.]  “The Specific Plan provides for the removal of the existing stadium and redevelopment of the River Park and Mixed Use Site with an 18,000 to 22,000 seat Sports Stadium (if used for professional soccer), or 28,000 to 32,000 seats if used for joint-use soccer and collegiate football, that could be expanded to 40,000 seats at a later time pursuant to subsequent approvals.”

21. [See SDSU West Initiative Chapter 3 § 22.0908 (n)]  “Such sale, upon completion, shall ensure that the City does not pay for any stadium rehabilitation costs, stadium demolition or removal costs, stadium cost overruns, Joint Use Stadium operating costs, Joint Use Stadium maintenance, or Joint Use Stadium capital improvement expenses.”

22. [See Soccer City Initiative Page 20, Section 61.2803 (e) (3) (B)]   “The City shall continue to retain its existing responsibility for costs or damage caused or associated with ongoing operations related to the Existing Stadium prior to the demolition of the Existing Stadium, and the burden of such costs shall not be shifted from the City to the Qualified Lessee under the standards of any Lease.”

23. [See Soccer City Initiative Page 226, Specific Plan Section 8.3, page 8.3.]  “Following development of the Sports Stadium, park areas and additional areas on the periphery of the River Park and Mixed Use Site, the existing stadium will be demolished and removed to create mixed use development areas.”  [Soccer City Initiative Page 24, Section 61.2803 (h) (1) (A)]  “If the Qualified Lessee fails to complete the construction of the Joint Use Stadium on the Existing Stadium Site by the Reverter Date, then the City shall have the Reverter Right to (i) terminate any Lease (subject to any non-disturbance agreement with any sublessee of any portion of the Property, other than the Stadium Land) and (ii) cause the ownership of any land transferred by the City under the Option to revert to the City.” [See Soccer City Initiative Page 12, Section 61.2802]  “Reverter Date means seven (7) years from the Execution Date.”

24. [Soccer City Initiative Page 15, Section 61.2803 (c) (11)]  “To implement the City’s policy goal of providing affordable housing, any Lease shall require the Qualified Lessee to construct and provide for: (i) the greater of ten (10) percent of dwelling units on the Existing Stadium Site or eighty (80) dwelling units as affordable to and occupied by “targeted rental households” (as used in San Diego Municipal Code Chapter 14, Article 2, Division 13); or (ii) equivalent for-sale affordable residential units. To further this goal of providing affordable housing, the Qualified Lessee under any Lease shall take all other steps necessary to satisfy San Diego Municipal Code Chapter 14, Article 2, Division 13, including consenting to the recordation of any required Declaration of Covenants, Conditions, and Restrictions. This requirement shall apply from and after the tenth anniversary of the effective date of any Lease.” [See SDSU West Initiative Chapter 3 § 22.0908 (l)]  “Such sale and ultimate development shall require development within the Existing Stadium Site to comply with the City’s development impact fee requirements, parkland dedication requirements, and housing impact fees/affordable housing requirements.”

25. [Soccer City Initiative Page 8, Section 5.]  “Hotel/Motel Facilities will require a Planned Commercial Development (PCD) permit to implement the design recommendations of this Plan and ensure compatibility with the development regulations of the Montgomery Field Master Plan and the Airport Land Use Compatibility Plans for Montgomery Field and MCAS Miramar, except those areas located within the San Diego River Park, Soccer City, and Qualcomm Stadium Redevelopment Specific Plan Area, which shall allow Hotel development by right.”

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